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Bekker Investments has grown from strength to strength since opening in 1984. The Brokerage has established a reputation for professional service and the best possible solution to meet your financial needs. Bekker Investments are Authorised Financial Service Providers FSB No: 42759.

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About us

Bekker Investments has grown from strength to strength since opening in 1984. The Brokerage has established a reputation for professional service and the best possible solution to meet your financial needs.

Paul Bekker’s career as a Financial Advisor began in September 1981, when he joined a Private Brokerage as a partner after gaining experience in the financial sector with a well-known Service Provider.

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Financial emigration is the new way out

Financial emigration is on the rise – by 30% over the last two years, according to Claudia Apicella, head of Financial Emigration, a specialist advisory group targeting financial emigres.

The main reason? The imminent change in the law requiring South Africans working abroad to pay tax of up to 45% on any earnings above R1 million. The new rules come into effect in March 2020.

“In 2017 the National Treasury and SA Revenue Services (Sars) announced that they would be introducing major changes in the tax exemption on South African expatriates,” says Apicella.

Many South Africans working abroad earning more than R1 million have decided to cut their financial ties with the country as a pure tax relief mechanism.

“Taxing South Africans working abroad is the wrong move,” says economist Mike Schüssler of Economists.co.za. “It may provide a bit of a boost in tax collections in the short term, but at what cost to the country? We are taxing ourselves into poverty and this move aimed at taxing expatriates’ income is going to encourage more people to leave the country.”

South Africans are already over-taxed, handing over 41% of annual earnings above R700 000 (not counting Vat, local government taxes, and pension and medical aid contributions), compared to the US where a marginal tax rate of 38% kicks in at the equivalent annual earnings of R6 million.